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Krebs on Security

Google to Fix Location Data Leak in Google Home, Chromecast

20 hours 45 minutes ago
Google in the coming weeks is expected to fix a location privacy leak in two of its most popular consumer products. New research shows that Web sites can run a simple script in the background that collects precise location data on people who have a Google Home or Chromecast device installed anywhere on their local network.
BrianKrebs

Librarian Sues Equifax Over 2017 Data Breach, Wins $600

5 days 14 hours ago
In the days following revelations last September that big-three consumer credit bureau Equifax had been hacked and relieved of personal data on nearly 150 million people, many Americans no doubt felt resigned and powerless to control their information. But not Jessamyn West. The 49-year-old librarian from a tiny town in Vermont took Equifax to court. And now she's celebrating a small but symbolic victory after a small claims court awarded her $600 in damages stemming from the 2017 breach.
BrianKrebs

Microsoft Patch Tuesday, June 2018 Edition

6 days 13 hours ago
Microsoft today pushed out a bevy of software updates to fix more than four dozen security holes in Windows and related software. Almost a quarter of the vulnerabilities addressed in this month's patch batch earned Microsoft's "critical" rating, meaning malware or miscreants can exploit the flaws to break into vulnerable systems without any help from users.
BrianKrebs

Bad .Men at .Work. Please Don’t .Click

1 week ago
Web site names ending in new top-level domains (TLDs) like .men, .work and .click are some of the riskiest and spammy-est on the Internet, according to experts who track such concentrations of badness online. Not that there still aren't a whole mess of nasty .com, .net and .biz domains out there, but relative to their size (i.e. overall number of domains) these newer TLDs are far dicier to visit than most online destinations.
BrianKrebs

Adobe Patches Zero-Day Flash Flaw

1 week 4 days ago
Adobe has released an emergency update to address a critical security hole in its Flash Player browser plugin that is being actively exploited to deploy malicious software. If you've got Flash installed -- and if you're using Google Chrome or a recent version of Microsoft Windows you do -- it's time once again to make sure your copy of Flash is either patched, hobbled or removed.
BrianKrebs

Further Down the Trello Rabbit Hole

1 week 5 days ago
Last month's story about organizations exposing passwords and other sensitive data via collaborative online spaces at Trello.com only scratched the surface of the problem. A deeper dive suggests a large number of government agencies, marketing firms, healthcare organizations and IT support companies are publishing credentials via public Trello boards that quickly get indexed by the major search engines.
BrianKrebs

Are Your Google Groups Leaking Data?

2 weeks 3 days ago
Google is reminding organizations to review how much of their Google Groups mailing lists should be public and indexed by Google.com. The notice was prompted in part by a review that KrebsOnSecurity undertook with several researchers who've been busy cataloging thousands of companies that are using public Google Groups lists to manage customer support and in some cases sensitive internal communications.
BrianKrebs

Will the Real Joker’s Stash Come Forward?

2 weeks 6 days ago
For as long as scam artists have been around so too have opportunistic thieves who specialize in ripping off other scam artists. This is the story about a group of Pakistani Web site designers who apparently have made an impressive living impersonating some of the most popular and well known "carding" markets, or online stores that sell stolen credit cards.
BrianKrebs

FBI: Kindly Reboot Your Router Now, Please

3 weeks ago
The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is warning that a new malware threat has rapidly infected more than a half-million consumer devices. To help arrest the spread of the malware, the FBI and security firms are urging home Internet users to reboot routers and network-attached storage devices made by a range of technology manufacturers.
BrianKrebs

Why Is Your Location Data No Longer Private?

3 weeks 2 days ago
The past month has seen one blockbuster revelation after another about how our mobile phone and broadband providers have been leaking highly sensitive customer information, including real-time location data and customer account details. In the wake of these consumer privacy debacles, many are left wondering who's responsible for policing these industries? How exactly did we get to this point? What prospects are there for changes to address this national privacy crisis at the legislative and regulatory levels? These are some of the questions we'll explore in this article.
BrianKrebs

3 Charged In Fatal Kansas ‘Swatting’ Attack

3 weeks 4 days ago
Federal prosecutors have charged three men with carrying out a deadly hoax known as "swatting," in which perpetrators call or message a target's local 911 operators claiming a fake hostage situation or a bomb threat in progress at the target's address -- with the expectation that local police may respond to the scene with deadly force. While only one of the three men is accused of making the phony call to police that got an innocent man shot and killed, investigators say the other two men's efforts to taunt and deceive one another ultimately helped point the gun.
BrianKrebs

Mobile Giants: Please Don’t Share the Where

3 weeks 6 days ago
Your mobile phone is giving away your approximate location all day long. This isn't exactly a secret: It has to share this data with your mobile provider constantly to provide better call quality and to route any emergency 911 calls straight to your location. But now, the major mobile providers in the United States -- AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon -- are selling this location information to third party companies -- in real time -- without your consent or a court order, and with apparently zero accountability for how this data will be used, stored, shared or protected. It may be tough to put a price on one's location privacy, but here's something of which you can be sure: The mobile carriers are selling data about where you are at any time, without your consent, to third-parties for probably far less than you might be willing to pay to secure it.
BrianKrebs

T-Mobile Employee Made Unauthorized ‘SIM Swap’ to Steal Instagram Account

1 month ago
T-Mobile is investigating a retail store employee who allegedly made unauthorized changes to a subscriber's account in an elaborate scheme to steal the customer's three-letter Instagram username. The modifications, which could have let the rogue employee empty bank accounts associated with the targeted T-Mobile subscriber, were made even though the victim customer already had taken steps recommended by the mobile carrier to help minimize the risks of account takeover. Here's what happened, and some tips on how you can protect yourself from a similar fate.
BrianKrebs

Tracking Firm LocationSmart Leaked Location Data for Customers of All Major U.S. Mobile Carriers Without Consent in Real Time Via Its Web Site

1 month ago
LocationSmart, a U.S. based company that acts as an aggregator of real-time data about the precise location of mobile phone devices, has been leaking this information to anyone via a buggy component of its Web site -- without the need for any password or other form of authentication or authorization -- KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The company took the vulnerable service offline early this afternoon after being contacted by KrebsOnSecurity, which verified that it could be used to reveal the location of any AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile or Verizon phone in the United States to an accuracy of within a few hundred yards.
BrianKrebs

Detecting Cloned Cards at the ATM, Register

1 month ago
Much of the fraud involving counterfeit credit, ATM debit and retail gift cards relies on the ability of thieves to use cheap, widely available hardware to encode stolen data onto any card's magnetic stripe. But new research suggests retailers and ATM operators could reliably detect counterfeit cards using a simple technology that flags cards which appear to have been altered by such tools.
BrianKrebs

Think You’ve Got Your Credit Freezes Covered? Think Again.

1 month 1 week ago
I spent a few days last week speaking at and attending a conference on responding to identity theft. The forum was held in Florida, one of the major epicenters for identity fraud complaints in United States. One gripe I heard from several presenters was that identity thieves increasingly are finding ways to open new mobile phone accounts in the names of people who have already frozen their credit files with the big-three credit bureaus. Here's a look at what may be going on, and how you can protect yourself.
BrianKrebs

Microsoft Patch Tuesday, May 2018 Edition

1 month 1 week ago
Microsoft today released a bundle of security updates to fix at least 67 holes in its various Windows operating systems and related software, including one dangerous flaw that Microsoft warns is actively being exploited. Meanwhile, as it usually does on Microsoft's Patch Tuesday -- the second Tuesday of each month -- Adobe has a new Flash Player update that addresses a single but critical security weakness. First, the Flash Tuesday update, which brings Flash Player to v. 29.0.0.171. Some (present company included) would argue that Flash Player is in itself "a single but critical security weakness." Nevertheless, Google Chrome and Internet Explorer/Edge ship with their own versions of Flash, which get updated automatically when new versions of these browsers are made available.
BrianKrebs

Study: Attack on KrebsOnSecurity Cost IoT Device Owners $323K

1 month 1 week ago
A monster distributed denial-of-service attack (DDoS) against KrebsOnSecurity.com in 2016 knocked this site offline for nearly four days. The attack was executed through a network of hacked "Internet of Things" (IoT) devices such as Internet routers, security cameras and digital video recorders. A new study that tries to measure the direct cost of that one attack for IoT device users whose machines were swept up in the assault found that it may have cost device owners a total of $323,973.75 in excess power and added bandwidth consumption. My bad.
BrianKrebs

Twitter to All Users: Change Your Password Now!

1 month 2 weeks ago
Twitter just asked all 300+ million users to reset their passwords, citing the exposure of user passwords via a bug that stored passwords in plain text -- without protecting them with any sort of encryption technology that would mask a Twitter user's true password. The social media giant says it has fixed the bug and that so far its investigation hasn't turned up any signs of a breach or that anyone misused the information. But if you have a Twitter account, please change your account password now.
BrianKrebs
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2 hours 42 minutes ago
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