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Krebs on Security

Chase ‘Glitch’ Exposed Customer Accounts

13 hours 29 minutes ago
Multiple Chase.com customers have reported logging in to their bank accounts, only to be presented with another customer's bank account details. Chase has acknowledged the incident, saying it was caused by a two an internal "glitch" Wednesday evening that did not involve any kind of hacking attempt or cyber attack.
BrianKrebs

Money Laundering Via Author Impersonation on Amazon?

3 days 2 hours ago
Patrick Reames had no idea why Amazon.com sent him a 1099 form saying he'd made almost $24,000 selling books via Createspace, the company's on-demand publishing arm. That is, until he searched the site for his name and discovered someone has been using it to peddle a $555 book that's full of nothing but gibberish.
BrianKrebs

IRS Scam Leverages Hacked Tax Preparers, Client Bank Accounts

3 days 23 hours ago
Identity thieves who specialize in tax refund fraud have been busy of late hacking online accounts at multiple tax preparation firms, using them to file phony refund requests. Once the Internal Revenue Service processes the return and deposits money into bank accounts of the hacked firms' clients, the crooks contact those clients posing as a collection agency and demand that the money be "returned." In one version of the scam, criminals are pretending to be debt collection agency officials acting on behalf of the IRS. They'll call taxpayers who've had fraudulent tax refunds deposited into their bank accounts, claim the refund was deposited in error, and threaten recipients with criminal charges if they fail to forward the money to the collection agency. This is exactly what happened to a number of customers at a half dozen banks in Oklahoma earlier this month. Elaine Dodd, executive vice president of the fraud division at the Oklahoma Bankers Association, said many financial institutions in the Oklahoma City area had "a good number of customers" who had large sums deposited into their bank accounts at the same time.
BrianKrebs

New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

1 week ago
Companies around the globe are scrambling to comply with new European privacy regulations that take effect a little more than three months from now. But many security experts are worried that the changes being ushered in by the rush to adhere to the law may make it more difficult to track down cybercriminals and less likely that organizations will be willing to share data about new online threats. On May 25, 2018, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) takes effect. The law, enacted by the European Parliament, requires technology companies to get affirmative consent for any information they collect on people within the European Union. Organizations that violate the GDPR could face fines of up to four percent of global annual revenues.
BrianKrebs

Microsoft Patch Tuesday, February 2018 Edition

1 week 2 days ago
Microsoft today released a bevy of security updates to tackle more than 50 serious weaknesses in Windows, Internet Explorer/Edge, Microsoft Office and Adobe Flash Player, among other products. A good number of the patches issued today ship with Microsoft's "critical" rating, meaning the problems they fix could be exploited remotely by miscreants or malware to seize complete control over vulnerable systems -- with little or no help from users.
BrianKrebs

Domain Theft Strands Thousands of Web Sites

1 week 4 days ago
Newtek Business Services Corp. [NASDAQ:NEWT], a Web services conglomerate that operates more than 100,000 business Web sites and some 40,000 managed technology accounts, had several of its core domain names stolen over the weekend. The theft shut off email and stranded Web sites for many of Newtek's customers. An email blast Newtek sent to customers late Saturday evening made no mention of a breach or incident, saying only that the company was changing domains due to "increased" security. A copy of that message can be read here (PDF). In reality, three of their core domains were hijacked by a Vietnamese hacker, who replaced the login page many Newtek customers used to remotely manage their Web sites (webcontrolcenter[dot]com) with a live Web chat service. As a result, Newtek customers seeking answers to why their Web sites no longer resolved correctly ended up chatting with the hijacker instead.
BrianKrebs

U.S. Arrests 13, Charges 36 in ‘Infraud’ Cybercrime Forum Bust

2 weeks ago
The U.S. Justice Department announced charges on Wednesday against three dozen individuals thought to be key members of 'Infraud," a long-running cybercrime forum that federal prosecutors say cost consumers more than a half billion dollars. In conjunction with the forum takedown, 13 alleged Infraud members from the United States and six other countries were arrested. Started in October 2010, Infraud was short for "In Fraud We Trust," and collectively the forum referred to itself as the "Ministry of Fraudulently [sic] Affairs." As a mostly English-language fraud forum, Infraud attracted nearly 11,000 members from around the globe who sold, traded and bought everything from stolen identities and credit card accounts to ATM skimmers, botnet hosting and malicious software.
BrianKrebs

Would You Have Spotted This Skimmer?

2 weeks 2 days ago
When you realize how easy it is for thieves to compromise an ATM or credit card terminal with skimming devices, it's difficult not to inspect or even pull on these machines when you're forced to use them personally -- half expecting something will come detached. For those unfamiliar with the stealth of these skimming devices and the thieves who install them, read on.
BrianKrebs

Alleged Spam Kingpin ‘Severa’ Extradited to US

2 weeks 3 days ago
Peter Yuryevich Levashov, a 37-year-old Russian computer programmer thought to be one of the world's most notorious spam kingpins, has been extradited to the United States to face federal hacking and spamming charges. Levashov, who allegedly went by the hacker name "Peter Severa," or "Peter of the North," hails from St. Petersburg in northern Russia, but he was arrested last year while in Barcelona, Spain with his family. Authorities have long suspected he is the cybercriminal behind the once powerful spam botnet known as Waledac (a.k.a. "Kelihos"), a now-defunct malware strain responsible for sending more than 1.5 billion spam, phishing and malware attacks each day.
BrianKrebs

Attackers Exploiting Unpatched Flaw in Flash

2 weeks 6 days ago
Adobe warned on Thursday that attackers are exploiting a previously unknown security hole in its Flash Player software to break into Microsoft Windows computers. Adobe said it plans to issue a fix for the flaw in the next few days, but now might be a good time to check your exposure to this still-ubiquitous program and harden your defenses. Adobe said a critical vulnerability (CVE-2018-4878) exists in Adobe Flash Player 28.0.0.137 and earlier versions. Successful exploitation could potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.
BrianKrebs

Drugs Tripped Up Suspects In First Known ATM “Jackpotting” Attacks in the US

3 weeks 2 days ago
On Jan. 27, 2018, KrebsOnSecurity published what this author thought a scoop about the first known incidence of U.S. ATMs being hit with "jackpotting" attacks, a crime in which thieves deploy malware that forces cash machines to spit out money like a loose Las Vegas slot machine. As it happens, the first known jackpotting attacks in the United States were reported in November 2017 by local media on the west coast, although the reporters in those cases seem to have completely buried the lede.
BrianKrebs

File Your Taxes Before Scammers Do It For You

3 weeks 3 days ago
Today, Jan. 29, is officially the first day of the 2018 tax-filing season, also known as the day that fraudsters start requesting phony tax refunds in the names of identity theft victims. Want to minimize the chances of getting hit by tax refund fraud this year? File your taxes before the bad guys can! Tax refund fraud affects hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of U.S. citizens annually. Victims usually first learn of the crime after having their returns rejected because scammers beat them to it. Even those who are not required to file a return can be victims of refund fraud, as can those who are not actually due a refund from the IRS.
BrianKrebs

First ‘Jackpotting’ Attacks Hit U.S. ATMs

3 weeks 5 days ago
ATM "jackpotting" -- a sophisticated crime in which thieves install malicious software and/or hardware at ATMs that forces the machines to spit out huge volumes of cash on demand -- has long been a threat for banks in Europe and Asia, yet these attacks somehow have eluded U.S. ATM operators. But all that changed this week after the U.S. Secret Service quietly began warning financial institutions that jackpotting attacks have now been spotted targeting cash machines here in the United States.
BrianKrebs

Registered at SSA.GOV? Good for You, But Keep Your Guard Up

3 weeks 6 days ago
KrebsOnSecurity has long warned readers to plant your own flag at the my Social Security online portal of the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) -- even if you are not yet drawing benefits from the agency -- because identity thieves have been registering accounts in peoples' names and siphoning retirement and/or disability funds. This is the story of a Midwest couple that took all the right precautions and still got hit by ID thieves who impersonated them to the SSA directly over the phone. In mid-December 2017 this author heard from Ed Eckenstein, a longtime reader in Oklahoma whose wife Ruth had just received a snail mail letter from the SSA about successfully applying to withdraw benefits. The letter confirmed she'd requested a one-time transfer of more than $11,000 from her SSA account. The couple said they were perplexed because both previously had taken my advice and registered accounts with MySocialSecurity, even though Ruth had not yet chosen to start receiving SSA benefits.
BrianKrebs

Chronicle: A Meteor Aimed At Planet Threat Intel?

4 weeks 1 day ago
Alphabet Inc., the parent company of Google, said today it is in the process of rolling out a new service designed to help companies more quickly make sense of and act on the mountains of threat data produced each day by cybersecurity tools. Countless organizations rely on a hodgepodge of security software, hardware and services to find and detect cybersecurity intrusions before an incursion by malicious software or hackers has the chance to metastasize into a full-blown data breach.
BrianKrebs

Expert: IoT Botnets the Work of a ‘Vast Minority’

4 weeks 1 day ago
In December 2017, the U.S. Department of Justice announced indictments and guilty pleas by three men in the United States responsible for creating and using Mirai, a malware strain that enslaves poorly-secured "Internet of Things" or IoT devices like security cameras and digital video recorders for use in large-scale cyberattacks. The FBI and the DOJ had help in their investigation from many security experts, but this post focuses on one expert whose research into the Dark Web and its various malefactors was especially useful in that case. Allison Nixon is director of security research at Flashpoint, a cyber intelligence firm based in New York City. Nixon spoke with KrebsOnSecurity at length about her perspectives on IoT security and the vital role of law enforcement in this fight.
BrianKrebs

Some Basic Rules for Securing Your IoT Stuff

1 month ago
Most readers here have likely heard or read various prognostications about the impending doom from the proliferation of poorly-secured "Internet of Things" or IoT devices. Loosely defined as any gadget or gizmo that connects to the Internet but which most consumers probably wouldn't begin to know how to secure, IoT encompasses everything from security cameras, routers and digital video recorders to printers, wearable devices and “smart” lightbulbs. Throughout 2016 and 2017, attacks from massive botnets made up entirely of hacked IoT devices had many experts warning of a dire outlook for Internet security. But the future of IoT doesn't have to be so bleak. Here's a primer on minimizing the chances that your IoT things become a security liability for you or for the Internet at large.
BrianKrebs

Bitcoin Blackmail by Snail Mail Preys on Those with Guilty Conscience

1 month 1 week ago
KrebsOnSecurity heard from a reader whose friend recently received a remarkably customized extortion letter via snail mail that threatened to tell the recipient's wife about his supposed extramarital affairs unless he paid $3,600 in bitcoin. The friend said he had nothing to hide and suspects this is part of a random but well-crafted campaign to prey on men who may have a guilty conscience.
BrianKrebs
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2 hours 38 minutes ago
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