Security Feed

Krebs on Security

Is Facebook’s Anti-Abuse System Broken?

2 days 3 hours ago
Facebook has built some of the most advanced algorithms for tracking users, but when it comes to acting on user abuse reports about Facebook groups and content that clearly violate the company's "community standards," the social media giant's technology appears to be woefully inadequate.
BrianKrebs

A Sobering Look at Fake Online Reviews

3 days 23 hours ago
In 2016, KrebsOnSecurity exposed a network of phony Web sites and fake online reviews that funneled those seeking help for drug and alcohol addiction toward rehab centers that were secretly affiliated with the Church of Scientology. Not long after the story ran, that network of bogus reviews disappeared from the Web. Over the past few months, however, the same prolific purveyor of these phantom sites and reviews appears to be back at it again, enlisting the help of Internet users and paying people $25-$35 for each fake listing.
BrianKrebs

Deleted Facebook Cybercrime Groups Had 300,000 Members

5 days 17 hours ago
Hours after being alerted by KrebsOnSecurity, Facebook last week deleted almost 120 private discussion groups totaling more than 300,000 members who flagrantly promoted a host of illicit activities on the social media network's platform. The scam groups facilitated a broad spectrum of shady activities, including spamming, wire fraud, account takeovers, phony tax refunds, 419 scams, denial-of-service attack-for-hire services and botnet creation tools. The average age of these groups on Facebook's platform was two years.
BrianKrebs

When Identity Thieves Hack Your Accountant

1 week 3 days ago
The Internal Revenue Service has been urging tax preparation firms to step up their cybersecurity efforts this year, warning that identity thieves and hackers increasingly are targeting certified public accountants (CPAs) in a bid to siphon oodles of sensitive personal and financial data on taxpayers. This is the story of a CPA in New Jersey whose compromise by malware led to identity theft and phony tax refund requests filed on behalf of his clients.
BrianKrebs

Adobe, Microsoft Push Critical Security Fixes

1 week 4 days ago
Adobe and Microsoft each released critical fixes for their products today, a.k.a "Patch Tuesday," the second Tuesday of every month. Adobe has updated its Flash Player program to resolve a half dozen critical security holes. Microsoft issued updates to correct at least 65 security vulnerabilities in Windows and associated software. The Microsoft updates impact many core Windows components, including the built-in browsers Internet Explorer and Edge, as well as Office, the Microsoft Malware Protection Engine, Microsoft Visual Studio and Microsoft Azure.
BrianKrebs

Don’t Give Away Historic Details About Yourself

1 week 6 days ago
Social media sites are littered with seemingly innocuous little quizzes, games and surveys urging people to reminisce about specific topics, such as "What was your first job," or "What was your first car?" The problem with participating in these informal surveys is that in doing so you may be inadvertently giving away the answers to "secret questions" that can be used to unlock access to a host of your online identities and accounts. I'm willing to bet that a good percentage of regular readers here would never respond -- honestly or otherwise -- to such questionnaires (except perhaps to chide others for responding). But I thought it was worth mentioning because certain social networks -- particularly Facebook -- seem positively overrun with these data-harvesting schemes. What's more, I'm constantly asking friends and family members to stop participating in these quizzes and to stop urging their contacts to do the same. On the surface, these simple questions may be little more than an attempt at online engagement by otherwise well-meaning companies and individuals. Nevertheless, your answers to these questions may live in perpetuity online, giving identity thieves and scammers ample ammunition to start gaining backdoor access to your various online accounts.
BrianKrebs

Secret Service Warns of Chip Card Scheme

2 weeks 3 days ago
The U.S. Secret Service is warning financial institutions about a new scam involving the temporary theft of chip-based debit cards issued to large corporations. In this scheme, the fraudsters intercept new debit cards in the mail and replace the chips on the cards with chips from old cards. When the unsuspecting business receives and activates the modified card, thieves can start draining funds from the account.
BrianKrebs

Dot-cm Typosquatting Sites Visited 12M Times So Far in 2018

2 weeks 4 days ago
A story published here last week warned readers about a vast network of potentially malicious Web sites ending in ".cm" that mimic some of the world's most popular Internet destinations (e.g. espn[dot]cm, aol[dot]cm and itunes[dot].cm) in a bid to bombard hapless visitors with fake security alerts that can lock up one's computer. If that piece lacked one key detail it was insight into just how many people were mistyping .com and ending up at one of these so-called "typosquatting" domains. On March 30, an eagle-eyed reader noted that four years of access logs for the entire network of more than 1,000 dot-cm typosquatting domains were available for download directly from the typosquatting network's own hosting provider. The logs -- which include detailed records of how many people visited the sites over the past three years and from where -- were deleted shortly after that comment was posted here, but not before KrebsOnSecurity managed to grab a copy of the entire archive for analysis.
BrianKrebs

Panerabread.com Leaks Millions of Customer Records

2 weeks 5 days ago
Panerabread.com, the Web site for the American chain of bakery-cafe fast casual restaurants by the same name, leaked millions of customer records -- including names, email and physical addresses, birthdays and the last four digits of the customer's credit card number -- for at least eight months before it was yanked offline earlier today, KrebsOnSecurity has learned. The data available in plain text from Panera's site appeared to include records for any customer who has signed up for an account to order food online via panerabread.com. The St. Louis-based company, which has more than 2,100 retail locations in the United States and Canada, allows customers to order food online for pickup in stores or for delivery.
BrianKrebs

Coinhive Exposé Prompts Cancer Research Fundraiser

3 weeks 1 day ago
A story published here this week revealed the real-life identity behind the original creator of Coinhive -- a controversial cryptocurrency mining service that several security firms have recently labeled the most ubiquitous malware threat on the Internet today. In an unusual form of protest against that story, members of a popular German language image-posting board founded by the Coinhive creator have vented their dismay by donating tens of thousands of euros to local charities that support cancer research. On Monday KrebsOnSecurity published Who and What is Coinhive, an in-depth story which proved that the founder of Coinhive was indeed the founder of the German image hosting and discussion forum pr0gramm[dot]com (not safe for work). I undertook the research because Coinhive's code primarily is found on tens of thousands of hacked Web sites, and because the until-recently anonymous Coinhive operator(s) have been reluctant to take steps that might curb the widespread abuse of their platform.
BrianKrebs

Omitting the “o” in .com Could Be Costly

3 weeks 3 days ago
Take care when typing a domain name into a browser address bar, because it's far too easy to fat-finger a key and wind up somewhere you don't want to go. For example, if you try to visit some of the most popular destinations on the Web but omit the "o" in .com (and type .cm instead), there's a good chance your browser will be bombarded with malware alerts and other misleading messages -- potentially even causing your computer to lock up completely. As it happens, many of these domains appear tied to a marketing company whose CEO is a convicted felon and once self-proclaimed "Spam King."
BrianKrebs

Who and What Is Coinhive?

3 weeks 6 days ago
Multiple security firms recently identified cryptocurrency mining service Coinhive as the top malicious threat to Web users, thanks to the tendency for Coinhive's computer code to be used on hacked Web sites to steal the processing power of its visitors' devices. This post looks at how Coinhive vaulted to the top of the threat list less than a year after its debut, and explores clues about the possible identities of the individuals behind the service.
BrianKrebs

San Diego Sues Experian Over ID Theft Service

4 weeks 2 days ago
The City of San Diego, Calif. is suing big three consumer credit bureau Experian, alleging that a data breach first reported by KrebsOnSecurity in 2013 affected more than a quarter-million people in San Diego but that Experian never alerted affected consumers as required under California law. The lawsuit, filed by San Diego city attorney Mara Elliott, concerns a data breach at an Experian subsidiary that lasted for nine months ending in 2013. As first reported here in October 2013, a Vietnamese man named Hieu Minh Ngo ran an identity theft service online and gained access to sensitive consumer data held by Experian's subsidiary by posing as a licensed private investigator.
BrianKrebs

Survey: Americans Spent $1.4B on Credit Freeze Fees in Wake of Equifax Breach

1 month ago
Almost 20 percent of Americans froze their credit file with one or more of the big three credit bureaus in the wake of last year's data breach at Equifax, costing consumers an estimated $1.4 billion, according to a new study. The findings come as lawmakers in Congress are debating legislation that would make credit freezes free in every state. The figures, commissioned by small business loan provider Fundera and conducted by Wakefield Research, surveyed some 1,000 adults in the U.S. Respondents were asked to self-report how much they spent on the freezes; 32 percent said the freezes cost them $10 or less, but 38 percent said the total cost was $30 or more. The average cost to consumers who froze their credit after the Equifax breach was $23. A credit freeze blocks potential creditors from being able to view or "pull" your credit file, making it far more difficult for identity thieves to apply for new lines of credit in your name.
BrianKrebs

15-Year-old Finds Flaw in Ledger Crypto Wallet

1 month ago
A 15-year-old security researcher has discovered a serious flaw in cryptocurrency hardware wallets made by Ledger, a French company whose popular products are designed to physically safeguard public and private keys used to receive or spend the user’s cryptocurrencies. Hardware wallets like those sold by Ledger are designed to protect the user's private keys from malicious software that might try to harvest those credentials from the user's computer.  The devices enable transactions via a connection to a USB port on the user's computer, but they don't reveal the private key to the PC. Yet Saleem Rashid, a 15-year-old security researcher from the United Kingdom, discovered a way to acquire the private keys from the Ledger devices. Rashid's method requires an attacker to have physical access to the device, and normally such attacks would fall under the #1 rule of security -- namely, if an attacker has physical access to your device it is not your device anymore.
BrianKrebs

Adrian Lamo, ‘Homeless Hacker’ Who Turned in Chelsea Manning, Dead at 37

1 month ago
Adrian Lamo, the hacker probably best known for breaking into The New York Times's network and for reporting Chelsea Manning's theft of classified documents to the FBI, was found dead in a Kansas apartment on Wednesday. Lamo was widely reviled and criticized for turning in Manning, but that chapter of his life eclipsed the profile of a complex individual who taught me quite a bit about security over the years. Adrian Lamo, in 2006. Source: Wikipedia. I first met Lamo in 2001 when I was a correspondent for Newsbytes.com, a now-defunct tech publication that was owned by The Washington Post at the time. A mutual friend introduced us over AOL Instant Messenger, explaining that Lamo had worked out a simple method allowing him to waltz into the networks of some of the world's largest media companies using nothing more than a Web browser.
BrianKrebs

Who Is Afraid of More Spams and Scams?

1 month ago
Security researchers who rely on data included in Web site domain name records to combat spammers and scammers will likely lose access to that information for at least six months starting at the end of May 2018, under a new proposal that seeks to bring the system in line with new European privacy laws. The result, some experts warn, will likely mean more spams and scams landing in your inbox.
BrianKrebs

Flash, Windows Users: It’s Time to Patch

1 month 1 week ago
Adobe and Microsoft each pushed critical security updates to their products today. Adobe's got a new version of Flash Player available, and Microsoft released 14 updates covering more than 75 vulnerabilities, two of which were publicly disclosed prior to today's patch release. The Microsoft updates affect all supported Windows operating systems, as well as all supported versions of Internet Explorer/Edge, Office, Sharepoint and Exchange Server. All of the critical vulnerabilities from Microsoft are in browsers and browser-related technologies, according to a post from security firm Qualys.
BrianKrebs

Checked Your Credit Since the Equifax Hack?

1 month 1 week ago
A recent consumer survey suggests that half of all Americans still haven't checked their credit report since the Equifax breach last year exposed the Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses and other personal information on nearly 150 million people. If you're in that fifty percent, please make an effort to remedy that soon. Credit reports from the three major bureaus -- Equifax, Experian and Trans Union -- can be obtained online for free at annualcreditreport.com -- the only Web site mandated by Congress to serve each American a free credit report every year.
BrianKrebs

Look-Alike Domains and Visual Confusion

1 month 2 weeks ago
How good are you at telling the difference between domain names you know and trust and imposter or look-alike domains? The answer may depend on how familiar you are with the nuances of internationalized domain names (IDNs), as well as which browser or Web application you're using. For example, how does your browser interpret the following domain? I'll give you a hint: Despite appearances, it is most certainly not the actual domain for software firm CA Technologies (formerly Computer Associates Intl Inc.), which owns the original ca.com domain name: https://www.са.com/ Go ahead and click on the link above or cut-and-paste it into a browser address bar. If you're using Google Chrome, Apple's Safari, or some recent version of Microsoft's Internet Explorer or Edge browsers, you should notice that the address converts to "xn--80a7a.com." This is called "punycode," and it allows browsers to render domains with non-Latin alphabets like Cyrillic and Ukrainian. Below is what it looks like in Edge on Windows 10; Google Chrome renders it much the same way. Notice what's in the address bar (ignore the "fake site" and "Welcome to..." text, which was added as a courtesy by the person who registered this domain):
BrianKrebs
Checked
1 hour 57 minutes ago
In-depth security news and investigation
Subscribe to Krebs on Security feed